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Precious metal guide

The alloys of the sample and the color of gold

The most common alloy of gold has a purity of 583. Alloys of this sample may be of different colors depending on the proportion contained therein of nonferrous metals. For example, if 583 gold alloy (58.3% gold) contains about 36% silver and 5.7% copper alloy, it will acquire a green tint.

At 18.3% silver and 23.4% the color will be semi-pink; with 8.3% silver and 33.4% semi-red. Depending on the mixture, it may have different melting points and hardnesses, and these alloys have good solderability.

958-purity Gold

Alloys of 958-purity gold are fragile and are therefore used in limited quantities. Three-alloy 958 alloys, other than gold, also include silver and copper, and are mainly used for the production of wedding pre-engagement rings. The alloy has a nice bright yellow color close to the color of pure gold. This alloy is very soft, so the polishing time on the finished product is kept short.

750 three-th alloys

Alloy 750 three-th sample is in the structure of copper and silver, and in some cases in the form of ligatures of rhodium, palladium, nickel, and zinc. The color ranges from yellowish-green through shades of reddish to white. The alloy lends itself well to soldering and casting and is the appropriate framework for the application of enamels, however, when the content in the alloy is more than 16% of the copper enamel, the color becomes dull. It is recommended to use it in the manufacturing of products with a subtle embossed knockout, filigree, and frames for fragile gems with diamonds tense.

375-purity Gold

375-purity gold usually contains 37.5% gold, 10.0% silver, 48.7% copper, and 3.8% palladium. It is used for making wedding rings.

White gold is widely used for the manufacture of diamond jewelry, and contains:

  • 583 gold alloy – 23.7-28.7% silver, 13.0-18% palladium or 17% nickel, 8.7% zinc, 16% copper;
  • 750 gold alloy – 7.0-15.0% silver, gold, palladium, 14% nickel, 2.0-5.0% zinc, and up to 15% copper.

The most common alloys

  • The most common silver alloy includes 875 samples. It is used for the manufacture of jewelry and tableware.
  • 916 alloy samples are used for the production of tableware coated with enamel.
  • 960-th alloys are for the production of filigree products.
  • Alloys of platinum and palladium are used in jewelry in small quantities.
  • Silver and brass products are used for protection against oxidation, and decorative elements are added with a coated-electrolytic alloy with a thin layer of 999-purity gold or 999-purity silver.

In modern jewelry, platinum alloy is rare, and it has conceded its position to white gold. For some uses, a two-jewelry alloy is 950, with a structure that is comprised of items including copper and platinum-iridium. The addition of iridium increases the hardness of the alloy.

Palladium is not yet recognized as a separate metal for the production of jewelry, but it has good prospects, as it is cheaper than platinum, it has a more intense white color and better workability, and acts the same as platinum by resisting tarnishing in the open air.

The most common alloy of gold

The most common alloy of gold has a purity of 583; alloys of this purity may be of different colors depending on the proportion of nonferrous metals contained therein. For example, if gold 583 gold (58.3% gold) contains about 36% silver and 5.7% copper alloy it acquires a green tint; at 18.3% silver and 23.4% it becomes semi-pink; and with 8.3% silver and 33.4% semi-red. Depending on the mixture, the gold may have different melting points and hardness. These alloys have good solderability.

Alloys of 958 gold are fragile and are therefore used sparingly. Three-Alloy 958 samples, other than gold, is made up of silver and copper, mainly used for the production of wedding rings and engagement rings. The alloy has a nice bright yellow color close to the color of pure gold. Very soft, and as a result little polishing is done to the finished product.

750 purity alloys are made up of copper and silver in addition to gold, in some cases, and in some cases rhodium, palladium, nickel, and zinc may be used. Colors range from yellowish-green through shades of red to white. The alloy lends itself well to soldering and casting, and is an appropriate choice for enamels, however, when there is a copper content of greater than 16% the enamel color becomes dull. It is recommended to use when manufacturing products with a subtle embossed knockout, filigree, and frames for fragile gems, or diamond setting.

375 purity gold usually contains: 37.5% gold, 10.0% silver, 48.7% copper, and 3.8% palladium. It is used for making wedding rings and promise rings. Engagement rings widely use white gold for the manufacture of diamond jewelry, which contains:

584 purity gold – 23.7-28.7% silver, 13.0-18% paladium or 17% nickel, 8.7% zinc, 16% copper
750 purity gold – 7.0-15.0% silver, 14% palladium, up to 4% nickel, 7.5-16.5% zinc, and up to 15% copper.

The most common alloy of silver has an 875 purity. It is used for the manufacture of jewelry and tableware. Alloy 916 samples are used for the production of tableware coated with enamel; Alloy 960-th is used for the production of filigree products.

Alloys of platinum and palladium are used in jewelry in small quantities.

Silver and brass products are used for protection against oxidation, and the design of these products is rapidly improving. These products use a coated-electrolytic alloy with a thin layer of 999-purity gold or 999-purity silver.

In modern jewelry, platinum alloy is quite rare, conceding its position to white gold. Some use a two-jewelry 950 alloy, whose structure is comprised of copper and platinum-iridium. The addition of iridium increases the hardness of the alloy.

Palladium is not yet recognized as a separate metal for the production of jewelry, but it has good prospects, as it is cheaper than platinum, it has a more intense white color, better workability, and like platinum, resists tarnishing in open air.

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